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Public Domain Stock Footage Apollo 13 Mission Houston We've Got A Problem
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Synopsis: Apollo 13 was the seventh manned mission in the American Apollo space program and was supposed to be the third spacecraft to land on the Moon. An emergency abort was declared when an oxygen tank exploded, causing extensive damage to the service module, eliciting the now famous understatement to Mission Control - "Houston, We've got a problem".

With limited power generation, loss of heating capability and more importantly, damage to the unit that removes carbon dioxide from the air, Astronauts James A. Lovell, John L. "Jack" Swigert, Fred W. Haise along with a crack team of NASA engineers on the ground race against time to bring Apollo 13 back home safely.... (read more)

Information: 1970 28:17 min COL
Show All NASA Early History Titles Apollo 13 Mission - Houston We've Got A Problem
Scenes Include:

Inside the module and Mission Control shots, personal commentary by the actual astronauts concerning the problems as they developed, national news footage and commentary, and a post-flight Presidential Address by President Richard M. Nixon.

As well as footage of the approach to the Moon and departing from Earth, and air-to-ground communication with Mission Control is included.

NASA Astronauts:

James A. Lovell Jr. - Mission Commander, John L. Swigert Jr. - Command Module Pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr.-Lunar Module Pilot.

Mission Control:

Christopher Kraft - Deputy Director Manned Spacecraft Center, Sigurd A. Joberg - Director of Flight Opeations, Glynn Lunney, Gerald Griffin, Eugene Kranz - Flght Directors. Donald K. Slayton - Director Flight Crew Operations.